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American Racism and White Supremacy - China GallandWho Had the Power at the San Rafael Mission?Project Censored
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Hidden Figures - COMmon Read 2017-2018  

Last Updated: Nov 8, 2017 URL: http://libguides.marin.edu/hiddenfigures Print Guide

Our Festival So Far! Print Page
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Book Giveaways at Both Campuses!

Image of Book Giveaway Sign at IVC  IVC Friends of the Library Chatting at Bookgiveaway
Amber and Dave gave away 100 copies of the the book at IVC (and quite a few cookies) to students, staff, faculty
and administrators. Sara Oser and the whole Intensive English Program showed up to support our festival. Thanks to
our student union, Associated Students of College of Marin, and our Basic Skills Initiative Steering Committee for footing
the bill. The giveaway at Kentfield suddenly took on a whole new meaning as the students staged a walk-out to protest
the repeal of DACA. To support the walkout, the book giveaway was moved from the library to the cafeteria,
where part of the protest activities were unfolding.

 

 

Love Cemetery, White Supremacy, and American Racism

  China Galland Lecture with audience

Over 80 people attended China Galland's "American Racism and White Supremacy" talk, including students from
Troy Stevenson's Umoja section of Counseling 110, Colleen Mihal's Communication 110, and Beth Patel's ESL 60.
China, a local author and filmmaker, shared clips from documentary that she is working on called
"Resurrecting Love," which is related to her book, Love Cemetery.

 

IVC Book Discussion

IVC's brand new, beautiful announcment board featured our book discussion.

Our book discussion at Indian Valley Campus Library was a happy mix of Intensive English Program students
and faculty from around the world and several members of the community who were able to
share their memories of the 1950s-1980s, especially in terms of racism and sexism.

We talked about about segregation in different parts of the country, including the Bay Area, as well
as sexism. We also discussed what kinds of resources the women in Hidden Figures had that 
helped them to persevere in the face of oppression.

 

Math Jeopardy!

Picture of Math Jeopardy Audience and Leaders

Professor Andrea Wang, Dean Carol Hernandez, and the students of MATH 103
doing battle algebraically in Math Jeopardy on October 10! Great to see support from across the college.

Picture of Math Jeopardy

Andrea Wang's MATH 103 students pondering the mysteries of algebra.

Picture of Math Jeopardy

The contestants, the audience, the judges -- everyone focused on math (of course)!

Picture of Math Jeopardy

The scorekeepers had a tough task keeping up with the contestants ever-changing scores, but they did a great job!
Note the copies of Hidden Figures in the foreground, many of which were taken home after the event by students.

 

Book Discussion with Professors King & Sheofsky

On November 1st, about 50 students from David King and Beth Sheofsky's English 150 classes (plus at least a couple of additional folks!) gathered to discuss the book. Beth's students were just starting the book, while Dave's students had reached the end and were thinking about their essays. It was an interesting meeting of readers who were able to talk about persistence, identity, meritocracy, and more. Many thanks to Dave King for leading the discussion, to both instructors for bringing their classes, to librarian Shirleigh Brannon for taking the pictures, and, most of all, to the students, who engaged in thoughtful discussion.

How would you describe of Shetterly's writing style?

What kind of place was the setting of the book, Hampton, Virginia?

What allowed the women in the book to persevere?

What is the relationship between meritocracy and identity?

Why read Hidden Figures?
One highlight: A student said that she hoped many girls and young women of color will read the book and be inspired to major in STEM fields.

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